13-YR-OLD BUILDS OWN HOUSE FOR $1,500: LOOK WHEN HE OPENS DOOR AND REVEALS 89 SQ FT MASTERPIECE

Do-It-Yourself projects are a cultural trend that has been around for a long time. There’s something about creating things with your hands that appeals to a lot of people. And in recent years, some have taken to building their own houses from scratch. The Internet is a great resource in that people can find guides and how-to videos to inform them on each stage of the process. It’s not rocket science, but it’s also not something you’d think a 13-year-old boy would be interested in doing.

Luke Thill is a 13-year-old from Dubuque, Iowa. Like any other teenage boy, he has lots of energy and is easily bored. But here’s where he sets himself apart: to cope with his boredom one summer, he decided to build a house in his parents’ backyard. The end result of this endeavor became so much more than he originally expected.

Luke set out to find the money and materials to complete his project, and first went to his parents for help. Though they approved of his efforts, they decided to let him do most of the work by himself. “It was a chance for a kid to do something more than play video games or sports,” said his dad Greg. “It teaches life lessons.” So how did Luke manage to get it done?

The teen cut neighbors’ lawns, raised funds online, and ran errands for people in his community as a trade-in for work or supplies. For example, a family friend who was an electrician helped him install the wiring in exchange for cleaning out his garage. Finally, he was able to gather enough money and materials to start building. Though it took him a lot longer than he anticipated…

One year later, Luke had raised $1,500 and collected enough stuff to begin building. He ended up using reclaimed or recycled materials for 75% of the house. In the process, he helped friends and neighbors get rid of unwanted things, like his uncle’s friend’s front door and many leftover items from his grandmother’s garage. Once building was firmly underway, he realized something that caught him by surprise.

Word of mouth had spread around town about the teen’s little venture. People were eager to know how he was doing so he decided to create a YouTube channel, where he kept viewers updated on his progress and also answered questions about the process. Before long, everyone in school knew his name, which might not have been the best thing for Luke at the time.

As his commitment and skill became clear to everyone, Luke was turning heads everywhere he went. Then, out of the blue, his principal called him into his office one day. “I don’t go there very often,” Luke said in one of his videos. “I’ve never gone there for anything bad.”

As it turned out, the principal was friends with a newspaper reporter from Indianapolis, who wanted to talk to the teen for a story. Despite the attention, Luke had to focus on finishing the project, and he still had obstacles to face before construction was done.

When creating the kitchen area for his tiny house, the teen decided to make a homemade countertop, using pieces of stained glass and liquid glaze. He researched the technique and studied YouTube videos of the process. But when time came to do it himself, the glaze leaked all through the mold. Though his idea failed, Luke did not let this deter him, and soon his perseverance paid off as he got an unexpected invitation.

The teen was contacted by a representative of TinyFest Midwest, a festival celebrating tiny houses and small living. They not only wanted Luke to attend, they also asked him to speak about the experience of building his tiny house. He was excited about preparing his speech since he’d recently earned a public speaking merit badge. And with the house almost finished, he’d soon be able to move in… except for one small detail.

Luke’s tiny house was finally done, as it had everything he would need to sleep, eat, and go about his day. Still, no house is complete without a few homely touches. After ensuring that his house was fully operational, he made sure the place looked warm and inviting. It had to look flawless. Afterall, now was the time to expose a year of hard work, not only to his family but to his entire fanbase and beyond.

Except he had one problem: the house had no toilet. The teen realized that installing plumbing was more than he could manage, but in the end he didn’t mind. “I liked the minimalism,” he told the Des Moines Register. Once the house was ready, he made a video tour that wowed everyone.